Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Obamacare is "Working a Little Better Than We Expected"––Judge for Yourself

Here is what President Obama said in a recent video, "The Affordable Care Act is working. It's working a little better than we expected."

On Tuesday, the administration announced that 11.4 million people signed up for Obamacare in the second open enrollment.

That number is higher than the number that will ultimately pay for their coverage and complete the enrollment. Even after they complete signing up the stragglers, it is more likely the paid for number will be about 10.5 million based upon a number of conversations I have had with carriers.

But let's assume they end up with as many as 11 million people. Would that exceed expectations?

Here is what the Congressional Budget Office projected in May of 2013:

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

A Detailed Analysis of the Republican Alternative to Obamacare

House Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton along with Senate Finance Chairman Orin Hatch and Senator Richard Burr have outlined what is, at least for now, the Republican alternative to Obamacare.

Republicans will now argue they have a better health insurance reform plan and that Obamacare should be repealed and replaced by it––particularly if the Supreme Court plunges the new health law into chaos by throwing the subsidies out in 37 states.

They will have an uphill battle. Not because these Republicans don't have a lot of good ideas, but because they have put a list of big and complicated changes on the table. Lots of people may not like Obamacare but Republicans have now really muddied the waters with a huge take it or leave it alternative that will have plenty of its own reasons to give voters pause.

My sense is that voters will end up liking parts of both Republican and Democratic ideas. They might ask a reasonable question: Why can't we take the best from both sides?

If Democrats would just admit Obamacare needs some pretty big fixes, and Republicans would be willing to work on making those fixes by putting some of these good ideas on the table, the American people would be a lot better off.

In fact, I am hopeful that this is eventually what will happen once Obamacare's failings become even more clear (particularly the real premium costs) and both sides come to understand that neither will have a unilateral political upper hand.

See my recent op-ed on how to fix Obamacare here.

Let's take an in-depth look at the Republican alternative, "The Patient Choice, Affordability, Responsibility, and Empowerment Act." 

It's key provisions include:
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